Archive for February, 2013

CHI ’13

By Oliver on February 13th, 2013 in conferences, HCI, publications, Uncategorized

ACM SIGCHI organizes the annual CHI conference (Human Factors in Computing Systems) - next edition CHI 2013 is in Paris, France, April 27 - May 2, 2013.

ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

http://chi2013.acm.org/

April 27 – May 2, Paris, France

Presentation of Paper: The Potentials of In-Situ-Projection for Augmented Workplaces in Production. A Study with Impaired Persons

The Potentials of In-Situ-Projection for Augmented Workplaces in Production. A Study with Impaired Persons

By Oliver on February 13th, 2013 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:

An assembly workplace augmented by the projection of instructions directly into the workspace ("in-situ") of the impaired worker.

An assembly workplace augmented by the projection of instructions directly into the workspace (“in-situ”) of the impaired worker.

The Potentials of In-Situ-Projection for Augmented Workplaces in Production.
A Study with Impaired Persons

In: Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2013, DOI = 10.1145/2468356.2468531

Abstract

Interactive projections have been around for more than a decade. We measured their potentials for augmented workplaces in production. For this purpose we built the prototype of an assistive system projecting instructions directly into the workspace (in situ). While it can be applied in every production environment, the system was first implemented and tested where it is needed the most: in a sheltered work organization employing persons with impairments.

It could be shown that the assembly times could be slightly reduced by the augmented system. However it had a “catalytic” effect on the test subjects’ work quality: While some seem to be overwhelmed by the new information density and perform worse, others perform much better than the control group and significantly reduce error rates. The qualitative results show that although impaired persons retain a critical perspective on systems directly changing the way they have been working for years, all users would like to retry working with the system. When looking at additional aids like the projection of a real-sized model in the workspace, the users invariantly accept its benefits for their assembly work.