Archive for the ‘HMI’ Category

Gamification of Production? A Study on the Acceptance of Gamified Work Processes in the Automotive Industry

By Oliver on July 25th, 2016 in assistive technology, gamification, HCI, HMI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Muschick, Peter; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Gamification of Production? A Study on the Acceptance of Gamified Work Processes in the Automotive Industry

In: Advances in Affective and Pleasurable Design. Proceedings of the AHFE 2016 International Conference, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, New York, NY, USA, 2016
DOI = 10.1007/978-3-319-41661-8_42

Abstract

In this work, we investigate how gamification can be integrated into work processes in the automotive industry. The contribution contains five parts:

(1) An introduction showing how gamification has become increasingly common, especially in education, health and the service industry.

(2) An analysis on the state of the art of gamified applications, discussing several best practices.

(3) An analysis of the special requirements for gamification in production, regarding both external norms and the mindset of workers in this domain.

(4) An overview of first approaches towards a gamification of production, focusing on solutions for impaired workers in sheltered work organizations.

(5) A study with a focus group of instructors at two large car manufacturers. Based on the presentation of three potential designs for the gamification of production, the study investigates the general acceptance of gamification in modern production and determines which design is best suited for future implementations.

Full Text

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305620223_Gamification_of_Production_A_Study_on_the_Acceptance_
of_Gamified_Work_Processes_in_the_Automotive_Industry

Presentation

This work will be presented at the conference
AHFE ’16: 7th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (July 27-31) in Orlando, FL, USA

AHFE-16

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

By Oliver on May 4th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

PETRA-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM,
New York, NY, USA, 2015
DOI = 10.1145/2769493.2769549

Abstract

Gamification is an ever more popular method to increase motivation and user experience in real-world settings. It is widely used in the areas of marketing, health and education. However, in production environments, it is a new concept. To be accepted in the industrial domain, it has to be seamlessly integrated in the regular work processes.

In this work we make the following contributions to the field of gamification in production: (1) we analyze the state of the art and introduce domain-specific requirements; (2) we present two implementations gamifying production based on alternative design approaches; (3) these are evaluated in a sheltered work organization. The comparative study focuses acceptance, motivation and perceived happiness.

The results reveal that a pyramid design showing each work process as a step on the way towards a cup at the top is strongly preferred to a more abstract approach where the processes are represented by a single circle and two bars.

Presentation

This work was presented at the PETRA 2015 in Korfu, Greece.

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

EICS-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = 10.1145/2774225.2774834

Abstract

Using video game elements to improve user experience and user engagement in non-game applications is called “gamification”. This method of enriching human-computer interaction has been applied successfully in education, health and general business processes. However, it has not been established in industrial production so far.

After discussing the requirements specific for the production domain we present two workplaces augmented with gamification. Both implementations are based on a common framework for context-aware assistive systems but exemplify different approaches: the visualization of work performance is complex in System 1 and simple in System 2.

Based on two studies in sheltered work environments with impaired workers, we analyze and compare the systems’ effects on work and on workers. We show that gamification leads to a speed-accuracy-tradeoff if no quality-related feedback is provided. Another finding is that there is a highly significant raise in acceptance if a straightforward visualization approach for gamification is used.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the EICS 2015 in Duisburg, Germany.

EICS 2015

By Oliver on April 24th, 2015 in conferences, HCI, HMI

The 7th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems

EICS-2015

http://eics2015.org/ | June 23-26, Duisburg, Germany

Presentation of Paper:
Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

By Oliver on March 10th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, conferences, HCI, HMI, publications

CHI-15_WorkshopFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

In: Proceedings of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Workshop End-User Development in the Internet of Things Era (EUDITE) ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = n/a

Abstract

In the Internet of Things area, sensor-based smart environments are becoming more and more ubiquitous. Smart environments can support user’s cognitive abilities and support them in various tasks e.g. assembling, or cooking.

However, programming applications for smart environments still requires a lot of e ort as many sensors
need to be programmed and synchronized. In this work, we present a novel approach for programming procedures in smart environments through demonstrating a task. We de fine abstract high-level areas that are triggered by the user while performing a task. According to the triggered areas, projected instructions for performing the task again are automatically created. Those instructions can then be transferred to other users to learn how to assemble a product or to cook a meal.

We present a prototypical implementation of a smart environment using optical sensors and present how it can be used in a smart factory and in a smart kitchen.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the CHI 2015 in Seoul, Korea.

Book chapter: Assistive Systems for the Workplace: Towards Context-Aware Assistance

By Oliver on February 10th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assistive Systems for the Workplace: Towards Context-Aware Assistance

In: Assistive Technologies for Physical and Cognitive Disabilities. IGI Global, 2015. pp 121-135
DOI = 10.4018/978-1-4666-7373-1.ch006

Abstract

Assist-Sys-for-the-WorkplaceRecent advances in motion recognition allow the development of Context-Aware Assistive Systems (CAAS) for industrial workplaces that go far beyond the state of the art: they can capture a user’s movement in real-time and provide adequate feedback. Thus, CAAS can address important questions, like Which part is assembled next? Where do I fasten it? Did an error occur? Did I process the part in time? These new CAAS can also make use of projectors to display the feedback within the corresponding area on the workspace (in-situ). Furthermore, the real-time analysis of work processes allows the implementation of motivating elements (gamification) into the repetitive work routines that are common in manual production.

In this chapter, the authors first describe the relevant backgrounds from industry, computer science, and psychology. They then briefly introduce a precedent implementation of CAAS and its inherent problems. The authors then provide a generic model of CAAS and finally present a revised and improved implementation.

http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/assistive-systems-for-the-workplace/122906

PhD thesis: Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection

At May 21st I finished my PhD in Computer Science at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) at the University of Stuttgart. The advisors were Prof. Dr. Albrecht Schmidt from the VIS and Prof. Dr. Fillia Makedon from the Universiy of Texas Alington (UTA). The work is based on the project ASLM acquired by Prof. Dr. Thomas Hörz from the University of Applied Sciences Esslingen and was continued in the project motionEAP.

Diss-CoverThe PhD is situated in the University of Stuttgart’s SimTech Cluster and was supported by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. It is published as “Open Source” – this means you can download and distribute this work freely as long as you indicate the source:

Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection (PDF, 7.7 MB)

If you prefer a printed version you can order it at Lulu Press.

Keywords:

assistive systems, assistive technologies, gamification, projection, motion recognition, context-aware, game design, human computer interaction, HCI, elderly, impaired, ethics, digital factory, cyber-physical systems, CPS

Abstract:

While context-aware assistive systems (CAAS) have become ubiquitous in cars or smartphones, most workers in production environments still rely on their skills and expertise to make the right choices and movements. (more…)

An Augmented Workplace for Enabling User-Defined Tangibles

Funk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:User-defined-Tangibles

An Augmented Workplace for Enabling User-Defined Tangibles

In: Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2014, DOI =10.1145/2559206.2581142

Abstract

In this work, we introduce a novel setup for an augmented workplace, which allows for de ning and interacting with user-de ned tangibles. State-of-the-art tangible user interface systems equip both the underlying surface and the tangible control with sensors or markers. At the workplace, having unique tangibles for each available action results in confusion. Furthermore, tangible controls mix with regular objects and induce a messy desk. Therefore, we introduce the concept of user-de fined tangibles, which enable a spontaneous binding between physical objects and digital functions. With user-de fined tangibles, the need for specially designed tangible controls disappears and each physical object on the augmented
workplace can be turned into a tangible control. We introduce our prototypical system and outline our proposed interaction concept.

Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Workplace using In-Situ Projection

table_sketchFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Assembly Workplace using In-Situ Projection

In: CHI ’14 Workshop on Assistive Augmentation. April 27th 2014.

Abstract [CHI-Worshop Paper]

In this paper, we argue for using in-situ projection to augment a user’s working experience. By recognizing objects on a workplace, the system is able to detect the current step within a workflow. Based on the information about position and orientation of the work-piece, speci c feedback can be given – even as a projection on top of the workpiece. So far, our work indicates that this technology is accepted by the industry. Currently, we are investigating the use of gami cation elements on the error rate. Additionally, we introduce a model for the conception of context aware assistive systems (CAAS). With our workshop participation, we want to discuss the potentials of in-situ projection at the manual workplace with the participants.

Tangible and Intuitive Interaction – Video of a Prototype

motionEAP-prototypeAt the University of Stuttgart Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) and the Korion GmbH I am part of a team developing the prototype of a new kind of assistive system in the project motionEAP. The prototype combines the 3D-spaces of the depth sensors Kinect and Leap Motion.

It detects individual fingers of both hands and allows to direct processes with simple gestures. Both gestures in space and touch events on the surface of the workspace are detected. At the same time the system allows to project videos or interactive 3D-spaces on any kind of surface.

As an example this allows to zoom or rotate a workpart through simple gestures. In future development iterations we will integrate object detection allowing a context- or product-specific feedback on processes, e.g. in manual assembly. This context-aware feedback is a pre-requisite for the later implementation of gamification components. These will allow to integrate feedback smoothly and least disruptive while motivating the assistive system’s users.

The following video illustrates the prototype’s current features: