Posts Tagged ‘acm’

Strategies for Playful Design when Gamifying Rehabilitation

Korn, Oliver; Tietz, Stefan:

Strategies for Playful Design when Gamifying Rehabilitation. A Study on User Experience

In: PETRA ’17 Proceedings of the 10h Int. Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2017, pp. 209-214

DOI = http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3056540.3056550 [to be published]

Text on ResearchGate

Abstract

Gamifying rehabilitation is an efficient way to improve motivation and exercise frequency. However, between flow theory, self-determination theory or Bartle’s player types there is much room for speculation regarding the mechanics required for successful gamification, which in turn leads to increased motivation. For our study, we selected a gamified solution for motion training (an exergame) where the playful design elements are extremely simple.

The contribution is three-fold: we show best practices from the state of the art, present a study analyzing the effects of simple gamification mechanics on a quantitative and on a qualitative level and discuss strategies for playful design in therapeutic movement games.

Presentation

The paper has been presented on June 23 at PETRA ’17, the 10th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments.

Designing Authentic Emotions for Non-Human Characters

By Oliver on June 1st, 2017 in affective, games, gamification, KORION, publications

Korn, Oliver; Stamm, Lukas; Moeckel, Gerd:

Designing Authentic Emotions for Non-Human Characters. A Study Evaluating Virtual Affective Behavior

In: DIS 17 Proceedings of the ACM SIGCHI Designing Interactive Systems Conference 2017

DOI = http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3064663.3064755

Text on ResearchGate

Abstract

While human emotions have been researched for decades, designing authentic emotional behavior for non-human characters has received less attention. However, virtual behavior not only affects game design, but also allows creating authentic avatars or robotic companions.

After a discussion of methods to model and recognize emotions, we present three characters with a decreasing level of human features and describe how established design techniques can be adapted for such characters.

In a study, 220 participants assess these characters’ emotional behavior, focusing on the emotion “anger”. We want to determine how reliable users can recognize emotional behavior, if characters increasingly do not look and behave like humans. A secondary aim is determining if gender has an impact on the competence in emotion recognition.

The findings indicate that there is an area of insecure attribution of virtual affective behavior not distant but close to human behavior. We also found that at least for anger, men and women assess emotional behavior equally well.

Presentation

The paper is presented on June 13 at the
ACM SIGCHI Designing Interactive Systems Conference 2017

Designing a System for Playful Coached Learning in the STEM Curriculum

Korn, Oliver; Rees Adrian, Dix, Alan:

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

In: SmartLearn ’17 Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Workshop on Intelligent Interfaces for Ubiquitous and Smart Learning, pp. 31-37

DOI = 10.1145/3038535.3038538

Text on ResearchGate

Abstract

We present the design outline of a context-aware interactive system for smart learning in the STEM curriculum (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). It is based on a gameful design approach and enables “playful coached learning” (PCL): a learning process enriched by gamification but also close to the learner’s activities and emotional setting.

After a brief introduction on related work, we describe the technological setup, the integration of projected visual feedback and the use of object and motion recognition to interpret the learner’s actions. We explain how this combination enables rapid feedback and why this is particularly important for correct habit formation in practical skills training. In a second step, we discuss gamification methods and analyze which are best suited for the PCL system. Finally, emotion recognition, a major element of the final PCL design not yet implemented, is briefly outlined.

Presentation

The paper was presented on March 13 at the SmartLearn ’17, a workshop within the ACM IUI 2017,
the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Intelligent User Interfaces Community

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

Korn, Oliver; Dix, Alan:

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

In: Interactions, 24(1), 54–57, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/3012951

Abstract

In this article, we present the vision of a context-aware system that supports educators and offers students what we call playful coached learning (PCL).

Insights

  • A system that is aware of real-world interactions strongly contributes to the user’s sense of interaction and exchange.
  • Adding gamification is not enough. PCL should also consider a student’s emotions.
  • Learning with a context-aware system can be a relief for students and educators, increasing their autonomy.
  • PCL is a good example of a combinatory innovation.

Computerized Assessment of the Skills of Impaired and Elderly Workers

Korn, Oliver; Tso, Leslie; Papagrigoriou, Christos; Sowoidnich, Yannic; Konrad, Robert; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Computerized Assessment of the Skills of Impaired and Elderly Workers. A Tool Survey and Comparative Study

In: PETRA ’16 Proceedings of the 9th Int. Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/2910674.2910675

Abstract

The number of impaired persons rises – as a result of both regular degradation with age and psychological problems like burnout. Sheltered work organizations aim to reintegrate impaired persons into work environments and prepare them for the re-entry in the regular job market.

Both for elderly and for impaired persons it is crucial to quickly assess the abilities, to identify limits and potentials and thus find work processes suitable for their skill profile.

This work focuses on the analysis and comparison of software-tools that assess the abilities of persons with impairments. We describe two established generic tools (CANTAB, Cogstate), analyze a yet unknown specialized tool (Hamet) and present a new gamified tool (GATRAS).

Finally we present a study with 20 participants, comparing the tools against a ground truth baseline generated by a realworld assembly task

Presentation

This work will be presented at the conference
PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments
PETRA ’16 (June 29 – July 01) on Corfu Island, Greece.

PETRA-16

Gamification of a Workday. A Study on the Effects in Sheltered Employment

By Oliver on February 9th, 2016 in assistive systems, conferences, gamification, HCI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Lang, Johannes; Korge, Andreas; Causegic, Haris; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Gamification of a Workday. A Study on the Effects in Sheltered Employment

CHI-16-LBW-gamification-workdayIn: CHI ’16 Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/2851581.2892283

Abstract

Gamification implies the application of methods and design patterns from gaming to non-gaming areas like learning or working. We applied an existing gamification design to production processes in an organization which provides sheltered employment for impaired persons.

In contrast to existing work, we investigated not only a short period but a complete workday to measure the effects on the performance of impaired workers.

The study indicates that gamification has
(1) a negative effect on workers with considerable cognitive impairments,
(2) no measurable effect on workers with medium cognitive impairments and
(3) a positive effect on workers with mild cognitive impairments.

PresentationCHI4good

This work will be presented at CHI ’16 (May 7-12) in San Jose, California, USA.

Determining the Characteristics of Preferred Virtual Faces

By Oliver on November 12th, 2015 in games, HCI, publications, Uncategorized

Schwind, Valentin; Wolf, Katrin; Henze, Niels; Korn, Oliver:

Determining the Characteristics of Preferred Virtual Faces Using an Avatar Generator

In: CHI PLAY ’15 Proceedings of the 2015 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, pp. 221-230, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015
DOI = 10.1145/2793107.2793116

Avatar-GeneratorAbstract

Video game developers continuously increase the degree of details and realism in games to create more human-like characters. But increasing the human-likeness becomes a problem in regard to the Uncanny Valley phenomenon that predicts negative feelings of people towards artificial entities.

We developed an avatar creation system to examine preferences towards parametrized faces and explore in regard to the Uncanny Valley phenomenon how people design faces that they like or reject. Based on the 3D model of the Caucasian average face, 420 participants generate 1341 faces of positively and negatively associated concepts of both gender. The results show that some characteristics associated with the Uncanny Valley are used to create villains or repulsive faces. Heroic faces get attractive features but are rarely and little stylized. A voluntarily designed face is very similar to the heroine. This indicates that there is a tendency of users to design feminine and attractive but still credible faces.

Presentation

This work was presented at CHI PLay ’15 in London.

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

EICS-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = 10.1145/2774225.2774834

Abstract

Using video game elements to improve user experience and user engagement in non-game applications is called “gamification”. This method of enriching human-computer interaction has been applied successfully in education, health and general business processes. However, it has not been established in industrial production so far.

After discussing the requirements specific for the production domain we present two workplaces augmented with gamification. Both implementations are based on a common framework for context-aware assistive systems but exemplify different approaches: the visualization of work performance is complex in System 1 and simple in System 2.

Based on two studies in sheltered work environments with impaired workers, we analyze and compare the systems’ effects on work and on workers. We show that gamification leads to a speed-accuracy-tradeoff if no quality-related feedback is provided. Another finding is that there is a highly significant raise in acceptance if a straightforward visualization approach for gamification is used.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the EICS 2015 in Duisburg, Germany.

PETRA 2015

By Oliver on April 28th, 2015 in conferences, gamification, HCI

The 8th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments (PETRA)

PETRA-15

http://petrae.org/ | July 1-3, Korfu, Greece

Presentation of Paper:

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

EICS 2015

By Oliver on April 24th, 2015 in conferences, HCI, HMI

The 7th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems

EICS-2015

http://eics2015.org/ | June 23-26, Duisburg, Germany

Presentation of Paper:
Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments