Posts Tagged ‘ambient assisted living’

Social Robots @ PETRA 18: Paper & Workshop

Korn, Oliver; Bieber, Gerald & Fron, Christian

Perspectives on Social Robots. From the Historic Background to an Experts’ View on Future Developments

In: PETRA ’18 Proceedings of the 11th Int. Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2018

DOI = https://doi.org/10.1145/3197768.3197774

Text on ResearchGate (after June 27)

 

Abstract

Social robots are robots interacting with humans not only in collaborative settings, but also in personal settings like domestic services and healthcare. Some social robots simulate feelings (companions) while others just help lifting (assistants). However, they often incite both fascination and fear: what abilities should social robots have and what should remain exclusive to humans?

  • We provide a historical background on the development of robots and related machines (1)
  • discuss examples of social robots (2)
  • and present an expert study on their desired future abilities and applications (3)
    conducted within the Forum of the European Active and Assisted Living Programme (AAL).

The findings indicate that most technologies required for the social robots’ emotion sensing are considered ready. For care robots, the experts approve health-related tasks like drawing blood while they prefer humans to do nursing tasks like washing. On a larger societal scale, the acceptance of social robots increases highly significantly with familiarity, making health robots and even military drones more acceptable than sex robots or child companion robots for childless couples. Accordingly, the acceptance of social robots seems to decrease with the level of face-to-face emotions involved.

Presentation

The work is presented on June 27 – 29 at PETRA 18 (PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments).
In addition, we will host a Workshop on Social Robots.

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

Korn, Oliver; Dix, Alan:

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

In: Interactions, 24(1), 54–57, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/3012951

Abstract

In this article, we present the vision of a context-aware system that supports educators and offers students what we call playful coached learning (PCL).

Insights

  • A system that is aware of real-world interactions strongly contributes to the user’s sense of interaction and exchange.
  • Adding gamification is not enough. PCL should also consider a student’s emotions.
  • Learning with a context-aware system can be a relief for students and educators, increasing their autonomy.
  • PCL is a good example of a combinatory innovation.

Delphi Study on Emotion Recognition within Workshop @ AAL-Forum 2016

AAL Forum 2016 KeynoteThe AAL Forum 2016 takes place in St. Gallen from September 26 to 29. Gerald Bieber from Fraunhofer IGD and Oliver Korn are chairing Workshop 28: From Recognizing Motion to Emotion Awareness – Perspectives for Future AAL Solutions:

There are several examples for the successful use of sensor-based motion recognition, e.g. for fall prevention or rehabilitation of elderly persons. However, motivation is always key when it comes to redundant exercises. While motion recognition helps to ensure a movement is performed correctly, emotion recognition can help to ensure an exercise is performed regularly.

The contribution of the workshop is three-fold. We will investigate best practices using motion recognition, show some potentials of emotion recognition and finally will develop perspectives for the application of emotion recognition in existing and future AAL solutions. The last section will be integrated in a Delphi study.

PhD thesis: Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection

At May 21st I finished my PhD in Computer Science at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) at the University of Stuttgart. The advisors were Prof. Dr. Albrecht Schmidt from the VIS and Prof. Dr. Fillia Makedon from the Universiy of Texas Alington (UTA). The work is based on the project ASLM acquired by Prof. Dr. Thomas Hörz from the University of Applied Sciences Esslingen and was continued in the project motionEAP.

Diss-CoverThe PhD is situated in the University of Stuttgart’s SimTech Cluster and was supported by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. It is published as “Open Source” – this means you can download and distribute this work freely as long as you indicate the source:

Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection (PDF, 7.7 MB)

If you prefer a printed version you can order it at Lulu Press.

Keywords:

assistive systems, assistive technologies, gamification, projection, motion recognition, context-aware, game design, human computer interaction, HCI, elderly, impaired, ethics, digital factory, cyber-physical systems, CPS

Abstract:

While context-aware assistive systems (CAAS) have become ubiquitous in cars or smartphones, most workers in production environments still rely on their skills and expertise to make the right choices and movements. (more…)

An Augmented Workplace for Enabling User-Defined Tangibles

Funk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:User-defined-Tangibles

An Augmented Workplace for Enabling User-Defined Tangibles

In: Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2014, DOI =10.1145/2559206.2581142

Abstract

In this work, we introduce a novel setup for an augmented workplace, which allows for de ning and interacting with user-de ned tangibles. State-of-the-art tangible user interface systems equip both the underlying surface and the tangible control with sensors or markers. At the workplace, having unique tangibles for each available action results in confusion. Furthermore, tangible controls mix with regular objects and induce a messy desk. Therefore, we introduce the concept of user-de fined tangibles, which enable a spontaneous binding between physical objects and digital functions. With user-de fined tangibles, the need for specially designed tangible controls disappears and each physical object on the augmented
workplace can be turned into a tangible control. We introduce our prototypical system and outline our proposed interaction concept.

Exergames for Elderly Persons: Physical Exercise Software Based on Motion Tracking within the Framework of Ambient Assisted Living

Ser.Games+Virt.Worlds-CoverKorn, Oliver; Brach, Michael; Hauer, Klaus & Unkauf, Sven:
Exergames for Elderly Persons: Physical Exercise Software
Based on Motion Tracking within the Framework of Ambient Assisted Living

In: Bredl, Klaus & Bösche, Wolfgang (eds.):
Serious Games and Virtual Worlds in Education,
Professional Development, and Healthcare
,
chapter 16, Information Science Reference / IGI Global,
Hershey, PA, USA, 2013, 258-268
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-3673-6.ch016

Abstract

This chapter introduces the prototype of a software developed to assist elderly persons in performing physical exercises to prevent falls. The result — a combination of sport exercises and gaming — is also called “exergame.” The software is based on research and development conducted within the
“motivotion60+” research project as part of the AAL-program (Ambient Assisted Living).

The authors outline the use of motion recognition and analysis to promote physical activity among elderly people: it allows Natural Interaction (NI) and takes away the conventional controller, which represented a hurdle for the acceptance of technical solutions in the target group; it allows the real-time scaling of the exergame’s difficulty to adjust to the user’s individual fitness level and thus keep motivation up. The authors’ experiences with the design of the exergame and the first results from its evaluation regarding space, interaction, design, effort, and fun, as well as human factors, are portrayed. The authors also give an outlook on what future exergames using motion recognition should look like.

Full Text

http://www.igi-global.com/book/serious-games-virtual-worlds-education/72157

ASSETS ’12

3rd International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility

http://www.sigaccess.org/assets12/

October 22-24, Boulder, Colorado, USA

Presentation of Paper: Assistive System Experiment Designer ASED: A Toolkit for the Quantitative Evaluation of Enhanced Assistive Systems for Impaired Persons in Production

GameDays 2012

3rd International Conference and 8th Science meets Business Workshop on Serious Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports plus 7th International Conference on E-Learning and Games
(organized by the University of Darmstadt)

http://www.gamedays2012.de/

September 18-20, Darmstadt, Germany

Presentation of Paper: Context-sensitive User-centered Scalability: An Introduction Focusing on Exergames and Assistive Systems in Work Contexts

Context-sensitive User-centered Scalability: An Introduction Focusing on Exergames and Assistive Systems in Work Contexts

Korn, Oliver; Brach, Michael; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas; Konrad, Robert:
Context-sensitive User-centered Scalability: An Introduction Focusing on Exergames and Assistive Systems in Work Contexts

In: Göbel, Stefan; Müller, Wolfgang; Urban, Bodo & Wiemeyer, Josed (eds.): E-Learning and Games for Training, Education, Health and Sports, Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences, vol. 7516, Springer, Berlin 2012, 164-176

Abstract (more…)

Assistive Technologies at Home and in the Workplace – A field of Research for Exercise Science and Human Movement Science

Brach, Michael & Korn, Oliver
Assistive Technologies at Home and in the Workplace –
A field of Research for Exercise Science and Human Movement Science

In: European Review on Aging an Physical Activity,  2012

http://www.springerlink.com/content/8153606317wr89r4/

Fulltext-PDF: Brach+Korn_2012_Assistive_Technologies_at_Home_and_in_the_Workplace

DOI 10.1007/s11556-012-0099-z

 

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