Posts Tagged ‘CHI’

Gamification of a Workday. A Study on the Effects in Sheltered Employment

By Oliver on February 9th, 2016 in assistive systems, conferences, gamification, HCI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Lang, Johannes; Korge, Andreas; Causegic, Haris; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Gamification of a Workday. A Study on the Effects in Sheltered Employment

CHI-16-LBW-gamification-workdayIn: CHI ’16 Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/2851581.2892283

Abstract

Gamification implies the application of methods and design patterns from gaming to non-gaming areas like learning or working. We applied an existing gamification design to production processes in an organization which provides sheltered employment for impaired persons.

In contrast to existing work, we investigated not only a short period but a complete workday to measure the effects on the performance of impaired workers.

The study indicates that gamification has
(1) a negative effect on workers with considerable cognitive impairments,
(2) no measurable effect on workers with medium cognitive impairments and
(3) a positive effect on workers with mild cognitive impairments.

PresentationCHI4good

This work will be presented at CHI ’16 (May 7-12) in San Jose, California, USA.

Determining the Characteristics of Preferred Virtual Faces

By Oliver on November 12th, 2015 in games, HCI, publications, Uncategorized

Schwind, Valentin; Wolf, Katrin; Henze, Niels; Korn, Oliver:

Determining the Characteristics of Preferred Virtual Faces Using an Avatar Generator

In: CHI PLAY ’15 Proceedings of the 2015 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, pp. 221-230, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015
DOI = 10.1145/2793107.2793116

Avatar-GeneratorAbstract

Video game developers continuously increase the degree of details and realism in games to create more human-like characters. But increasing the human-likeness becomes a problem in regard to the Uncanny Valley phenomenon that predicts negative feelings of people towards artificial entities.

We developed an avatar creation system to examine preferences towards parametrized faces and explore in regard to the Uncanny Valley phenomenon how people design faces that they like or reject. Based on the 3D model of the Caucasian average face, 420 participants generate 1341 faces of positively and negatively associated concepts of both gender. The results show that some characteristics associated with the Uncanny Valley are used to create villains or repulsive faces. Heroic faces get attractive features but are rarely and little stylized. A voluntarily designed face is very similar to the heroine. This indicates that there is a tendency of users to design feminine and attractive but still credible faces.

Presentation

This work was presented at CHI PLay ’15 in London.

Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

By Oliver on March 10th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, conferences, HCI, HMI, publications

CHI-15_WorkshopFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

In: Proceedings of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Workshop End-User Development in the Internet of Things Era (EUDITE) ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = n/a

Abstract

In the Internet of Things area, sensor-based smart environments are becoming more and more ubiquitous. Smart environments can support user’s cognitive abilities and support them in various tasks e.g. assembling, or cooking.

However, programming applications for smart environments still requires a lot of e ort as many sensors
need to be programmed and synchronized. In this work, we present a novel approach for programming procedures in smart environments through demonstrating a task. We de fine abstract high-level areas that are triggered by the user while performing a task. According to the triggered areas, projected instructions for performing the task again are automatically created. Those instructions can then be transferred to other users to learn how to assemble a product or to cook a meal.

We present a prototypical implementation of a smart environment using optical sensors and present how it can be used in a smart factory and in a smart kitchen.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the CHI 2015 in Seoul, Korea.

CHI 2015

By Oliver on February 20th, 2015 in conferences, HCI

ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

CHI-2015

http://chi2015.acm.org/

April 18 – 23, Seoul, Korea

150420_CHI-15-reception-2_sm

CHI 2015 Conference Reception

CHI 2015 Conference Dinner – high interest…

 

Presentation of Paper: Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

An Augmented Workplace for Enabling User-Defined Tangibles

Funk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:User-defined-Tangibles

An Augmented Workplace for Enabling User-Defined Tangibles

In: Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2014, DOI =10.1145/2559206.2581142

Abstract

In this work, we introduce a novel setup for an augmented workplace, which allows for de ning and interacting with user-de ned tangibles. State-of-the-art tangible user interface systems equip both the underlying surface and the tangible control with sensors or markers. At the workplace, having unique tangibles for each available action results in confusion. Furthermore, tangible controls mix with regular objects and induce a messy desk. Therefore, we introduce the concept of user-de fined tangibles, which enable a spontaneous binding between physical objects and digital functions. With user-de fined tangibles, the need for specially designed tangible controls disappears and each physical object on the augmented
workplace can be turned into a tangible control. We introduce our prototypical system and outline our proposed interaction concept.

Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Workplace using In-Situ Projection

table_sketchFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Assembly Workplace using In-Situ Projection

In: CHI ’14 Workshop on Assistive Augmentation. April 27th 2014.

Abstract [CHI-Worshop Paper]

In this paper, we argue for using in-situ projection to augment a user’s working experience. By recognizing objects on a workplace, the system is able to detect the current step within a workflow. Based on the information about position and orientation of the work-piece, speci c feedback can be given – even as a projection on top of the workpiece. So far, our work indicates that this technology is accepted by the industry. Currently, we are investigating the use of gami cation elements on the error rate. Additionally, we introduce a model for the conception of context aware assistive systems (CAAS). With our workshop participation, we want to discuss the potentials of in-situ projection at the manual workplace with the participants.

CHI ’13

By Oliver on February 13th, 2013 in conferences, HCI, publications, Uncategorized

ACM SIGCHI organizes the annual CHI conference (Human Factors in Computing Systems) - next edition CHI 2013 is in Paris, France, April 27 - May 2, 2013.

ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems

http://chi2013.acm.org/

April 27 – May 2, Paris, France

Presentation of Paper: The Potentials of In-Situ-Projection for Augmented Workplaces in Production. A Study with Impaired Persons

The Potentials of In-Situ-Projection for Augmented Workplaces in Production. A Study with Impaired Persons

By Oliver on February 13th, 2013 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:

An assembly workplace augmented by the projection of instructions directly into the workspace ("in-situ") of the impaired worker.

An assembly workplace augmented by the projection of instructions directly into the workspace (“in-situ”) of the impaired worker.

The Potentials of In-Situ-Projection for Augmented Workplaces in Production.
A Study with Impaired Persons

In: Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2013, DOI = 10.1145/2468356.2468531

Abstract

Interactive projections have been around for more than a decade. We measured their potentials for augmented workplaces in production. For this purpose we built the prototype of an assistive system projecting instructions directly into the workspace (in situ). While it can be applied in every production environment, the system was first implemented and tested where it is needed the most: in a sheltered work organization employing persons with impairments.

It could be shown that the assembly times could be slightly reduced by the augmented system. However it had a “catalytic” effect on the test subjects’ work quality: While some seem to be overwhelmed by the new information density and perform worse, others perform much better than the control group and significantly reduce error rates. The qualitative results show that although impaired persons retain a critical perspective on systems directly changing the way they have been working for years, all users would like to retry working with the system. When looking at additional aids like the projection of a real-sized model in the workspace, the users invariantly accept its benefits for their assembly work.