Posts Tagged ‘flow’

Zenware Applications

By Oliver on July 9th, 2017 in assistive technology, conferences, HCI, publications

Gerbaulet, Damian & Korn, Oliver

Do Zenware Applications Reduce the Digital Distraction of Knowledge Workers? A Qualitative Study Based on Expert Interviews

In: Advances in Ergonomics in Design, pp. 115–126, Springer, Cham

DOI = https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-60582-1_12

Text on ResearchGate

Abstract

Applications helping us to maintain the focus on work are called “Zenware” (from concentration and Zen). While form factors, use cases and functionality vary, all these applications have a common goal: creating uninterrupted, focused attention on the task at hand. The rise of such tools exemplifies the users’ desire to control their attention within the context of omnipresent distraction. In expert interviews we investigate approaches in the context of attention-management at the workplace of knowledge workers. To gain a broad understanding, we use judgement sampling in interviews with experts from several disciplines. We especially explore how focus and flow can be stimulated. Our contribution has four components:

  1.  a brief overview on the state of the art,
  2. a presentation of the results,
  3. strategies for coping with digital distractions and design guidelines for future Zenware
  4. and an outlook on the overall potential in digital work environments.

Presentation

The work is presented on July 20 at AHFE ’17, the 8th International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics.

 

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

Korn, Oliver; Dix, Alan:

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

In: Interactions, 24(1), 54–57, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/3012951

Abstract

In this article, we present the vision of a context-aware system that supports educators and offers students what we call playful coached learning (PCL).

Insights

  • A system that is aware of real-world interactions strongly contributes to the user’s sense of interaction and exchange.
  • Adding gamification is not enough. PCL should also consider a student’s emotions.
  • Learning with a context-aware system can be a relief for students and educators, increasing their autonomy.
  • PCL is a good example of a combinatory innovation.

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

By Oliver on May 4th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

PETRA-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM,
New York, NY, USA, 2015
DOI = 10.1145/2769493.2769549

Abstract

Gamification is an ever more popular method to increase motivation and user experience in real-world settings. It is widely used in the areas of marketing, health and education. However, in production environments, it is a new concept. To be accepted in the industrial domain, it has to be seamlessly integrated in the regular work processes.

In this work we make the following contributions to the field of gamification in production: (1) we analyze the state of the art and introduce domain-specific requirements; (2) we present two implementations gamifying production based on alternative design approaches; (3) these are evaluated in a sheltered work organization. The comparative study focuses acceptance, motivation and perceived happiness.

The results reveal that a pyramid design showing each work process as a step on the way towards a cup at the top is strongly preferred to a more abstract approach where the processes are represented by a single circle and two bars.

Presentation

This work was presented at the PETRA 2015 in Korfu, Greece.

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

EICS-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = 10.1145/2774225.2774834

Abstract

Using video game elements to improve user experience and user engagement in non-game applications is called “gamification”. This method of enriching human-computer interaction has been applied successfully in education, health and general business processes. However, it has not been established in industrial production so far.

After discussing the requirements specific for the production domain we present two workplaces augmented with gamification. Both implementations are based on a common framework for context-aware assistive systems but exemplify different approaches: the visualization of work performance is complex in System 1 and simple in System 2.

Based on two studies in sheltered work environments with impaired workers, we analyze and compare the systems’ effects on work and on workers. We show that gamification leads to a speed-accuracy-tradeoff if no quality-related feedback is provided. Another finding is that there is a highly significant raise in acceptance if a straightforward visualization approach for gamification is used.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the EICS 2015 in Duisburg, Germany.

HCI International 2015

By Oliver on December 14th, 2014 in conferences
The 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
HCI-Logo
http://2015.hci.international/index.php
August 2-7, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Presentation of Paper:
The Effect of Gamification on Emotions. The Potential of Facial Recognition in Work Environments

The Effect of Gamification on Emotions. The Potential of Facial Recognition in Work Environments

Korn, Oliver; Boffo, Sandra; Schmidt, Albrecht:
The Effect of Gamification on Emotions. The Potential of Facial Recognition in Work Environments

In: Human-Computer Interaction: Design and Evaluation, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 9169, 489-499, Springer, Heidelberg, 2015
DOI = 10.1007/978-3-319-20901-2_46

Abstract

Emotion-DetectionGamification is a delightful concept: it is a creditable idea to use “video game elements to improve user experience and user engagement in non-game services and applications”. The link between emotions and motivation, especially in context of employee motivation, is important: after all, increased engagement should have numerous benefits like improved performance and greater user satisfaction.

This article describes how gamification can be used in work contexts like industrial production. Since industrial production already involves processes with measurable physical outcomes (e.g. the number of parts produced per hour), gaming elements like scores and leaderboards could be implemented with comparatively little effort. Ideally the system should also be able to measure the effect on speed and quality of the gamified work processes.

Presentation

The work will be presented at HCI International 2015 in Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2-7 August 2015

Context-aware Assistive Systems at the Workplace. Analyzing the Effects of Projection and Gamification

CAAS-ModelKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Abele, Stephan; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:
Context-aware Assistive Systems at the Workplace. Analyzing the Effects of Projection and Gamification

In: PETRA ’14 Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2014
DOI =10.1145/2674396.2674406

Abstract

Context-aware assistive systems (CAAS) have become ubiquitous in cars or smartphones but not in industrial work contexts: while there are systems controlling work results, context-specific assistance during the processes is hardly offered. As a result production workers still have to rely on their skills and expertise. While un-impaired workers may cope well with this situation, elderly or impaired persons in production environments need context-sensitive assistance.

The contribution of the research presented here is three-fold: (1) We provide a framework for context-aware assistive systems in production environments. These systems are based on motion recognition and use projection and elements from game design (gamification) to augment work. (2) Based on this framework we describe a prototype with respect to both the physical and the software implementation. (3) We present the results of a study with impaired workers and quantifying the effects of the augmentations on work speed and quality.

Gips-Schüle-Award for Research on Assistive Systems

Gips_Schuele_Forschungspreis2

Copyright by Gips-Schüle-Stiftung

On October 23rd 2013 the Special-Research Award for Human-Technology-Interaction by the Gips-Schüle-Foundation was awarded to the project ASLM. With the research lab located at the University of Applied Sciences Esslingen, the project aimed to develop a new kind of assistive system to support persons with impairments in production environments. The new assistive system uses motion tracking and projection. Within the project gamification elements were explored to improve motivation and work satisfaction. The system was constructed and built with the support of the company Schnaithmann. The system was evaluated at the sheltered work organization BWH Heilbronn. We congratulate the three awardees.

Basic research on assistive systems using motion recognition, projection and gamification can be found in the following publications:

Invited Talk @ GamEconomy

By Oliver on May 9th, 2013 in conferences

gameconomy-2013On June 7th I will be at the Stuttgart Media University (Wolframstraße 32, 70191 Stuttgart) giving the following talk:

From Applied Games to Augmented Reality:
Gaming Elements in the Industry

Exergames for Elderly Persons: Physical Exercise Software Based on Motion Tracking within the Framework of Ambient Assisted Living

Ser.Games+Virt.Worlds-CoverKorn, Oliver; Brach, Michael; Hauer, Klaus & Unkauf, Sven:
Exergames for Elderly Persons: Physical Exercise Software
Based on Motion Tracking within the Framework of Ambient Assisted Living

In: Bredl, Klaus & Bösche, Wolfgang (eds.):
Serious Games and Virtual Worlds in Education,
Professional Development, and Healthcare
,
chapter 16, Information Science Reference / IGI Global,
Hershey, PA, USA, 2013, 258-268
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-3673-6.ch016

Abstract

This chapter introduces the prototype of a software developed to assist elderly persons in performing physical exercises to prevent falls. The result — a combination of sport exercises and gaming — is also called “exergame.” The software is based on research and development conducted within the
“motivotion60+” research project as part of the AAL-program (Ambient Assisted Living).

The authors outline the use of motion recognition and analysis to promote physical activity among elderly people: it allows Natural Interaction (NI) and takes away the conventional controller, which represented a hurdle for the acceptance of technical solutions in the target group; it allows the real-time scaling of the exergame’s difficulty to adjust to the user’s individual fitness level and thus keep motivation up. The authors’ experiences with the design of the exergame and the first results from its evaluation regarding space, interaction, design, effort, and fun, as well as human factors, are portrayed. The authors also give an outlook on what future exergames using motion recognition should look like.

Full Text

http://www.igi-global.com/book/serious-games-virtual-worlds-education/72157