Posts Tagged ‘motion recognition’

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

Korn, Oliver; Dix, Alan:

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

In: Interactions, 24(1), 54–57, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/3012951

Abstract

In this article, we present the vision of a context-aware system that supports educators and offers students what we call playful coached learning (PCL).

Insights

  • A system that is aware of real-world interactions strongly contributes to the user’s sense of interaction and exchange.
  • Adding gamification is not enough. PCL should also consider a student’s emotions.
  • Learning with a context-aware system can be a relief for students and educators, increasing their autonomy.
  • PCL is a good example of a combinatory innovation.

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

By Oliver on May 4th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

PETRA-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM,
New York, NY, USA, 2015
DOI = 10.1145/2769493.2769549

Abstract

Gamification is an ever more popular method to increase motivation and user experience in real-world settings. It is widely used in the areas of marketing, health and education. However, in production environments, it is a new concept. To be accepted in the industrial domain, it has to be seamlessly integrated in the regular work processes.

In this work we make the following contributions to the field of gamification in production: (1) we analyze the state of the art and introduce domain-specific requirements; (2) we present two implementations gamifying production based on alternative design approaches; (3) these are evaluated in a sheltered work organization. The comparative study focuses acceptance, motivation and perceived happiness.

The results reveal that a pyramid design showing each work process as a step on the way towards a cup at the top is strongly preferred to a more abstract approach where the processes are represented by a single circle and two bars.

Presentation

This work was presented at the PETRA 2015 in Korfu, Greece.

Book chapter: Assistive Systems for the Workplace: Towards Context-Aware Assistance

By Oliver on February 10th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assistive Systems for the Workplace: Towards Context-Aware Assistance

In: Assistive Technologies for Physical and Cognitive Disabilities. IGI Global, 2015. pp 121-135
DOI = 10.4018/978-1-4666-7373-1.ch006

Abstract

Assist-Sys-for-the-WorkplaceRecent advances in motion recognition allow the development of Context-Aware Assistive Systems (CAAS) for industrial workplaces that go far beyond the state of the art: they can capture a user’s movement in real-time and provide adequate feedback. Thus, CAAS can address important questions, like Which part is assembled next? Where do I fasten it? Did an error occur? Did I process the part in time? These new CAAS can also make use of projectors to display the feedback within the corresponding area on the workspace (in-situ). Furthermore, the real-time analysis of work processes allows the implementation of motivating elements (gamification) into the repetitive work routines that are common in manual production.

In this chapter, the authors first describe the relevant backgrounds from industry, computer science, and psychology. They then briefly introduce a precedent implementation of CAAS and its inherent problems. The authors then provide a generic model of CAAS and finally present a revised and improved implementation.

http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/assistive-systems-for-the-workplace/122906

The Effect of Gamification on Emotions. The Potential of Facial Recognition in Work Environments

Korn, Oliver; Boffo, Sandra; Schmidt, Albrecht:
The Effect of Gamification on Emotions. The Potential of Facial Recognition in Work Environments

In: Human-Computer Interaction: Design and Evaluation, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 9169, 489-499, Springer, Heidelberg, 2015
DOI = 10.1007/978-3-319-20901-2_46

Abstract

Emotion-DetectionGamification is a delightful concept: it is a creditable idea to use “video game elements to improve user experience and user engagement in non-game services and applications”. The link between emotions and motivation, especially in context of employee motivation, is important: after all, increased engagement should have numerous benefits like improved performance and greater user satisfaction.

This article describes how gamification can be used in work contexts like industrial production. Since industrial production already involves processes with measurable physical outcomes (e.g. the number of parts produced per hour), gaming elements like scores and leaderboards could be implemented with comparatively little effort. Ideally the system should also be able to measure the effect on speed and quality of the gamified work processes.

Presentation

The work will be presented at HCI International 2015 in Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2-7 August 2015

PhD thesis: Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection

At May 21st I finished my PhD in Computer Science at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) at the University of Stuttgart. The advisors were Prof. Dr. Albrecht Schmidt from the VIS and Prof. Dr. Fillia Makedon from the Universiy of Texas Alington (UTA). The work is based on the project ASLM acquired by Prof. Dr. Thomas Hörz from the University of Applied Sciences Esslingen and was continued in the project motionEAP.

Diss-CoverThe PhD is situated in the University of Stuttgart’s SimTech Cluster and was supported by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. It is published as “Open Source” – this means you can download and distribute this work freely as long as you indicate the source:

Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection (PDF, 7.7 MB)

If you prefer a printed version you can order it at Lulu Press.

Keywords:

assistive systems, assistive technologies, gamification, projection, motion recognition, context-aware, game design, human computer interaction, HCI, elderly, impaired, ethics, digital factory, cyber-physical systems, CPS

Abstract:

While context-aware assistive systems (CAAS) have become ubiquitous in cars or smartphones, most workers in production environments still rely on their skills and expertise to make the right choices and movements. (more…)

Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Workplace using In-Situ Projection

table_sketchFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Assembly Workplace using In-Situ Projection

In: CHI ’14 Workshop on Assistive Augmentation. April 27th 2014.

Abstract [CHI-Worshop Paper]

In this paper, we argue for using in-situ projection to augment a user’s working experience. By recognizing objects on a workplace, the system is able to detect the current step within a workflow. Based on the information about position and orientation of the work-piece, speci c feedback can be given – even as a projection on top of the workpiece. So far, our work indicates that this technology is accepted by the industry. Currently, we are investigating the use of gami cation elements on the error rate. Additionally, we introduce a model for the conception of context aware assistive systems (CAAS). With our workshop participation, we want to discuss the potentials of in-situ projection at the manual workplace with the participants.

Tangible and Intuitive Interaction – Video of a Prototype

motionEAP-prototypeAt the University of Stuttgart Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) and the Korion GmbH I am part of a team developing the prototype of a new kind of assistive system in the project motionEAP. The prototype combines the 3D-spaces of the depth sensors Kinect and Leap Motion.

It detects individual fingers of both hands and allows to direct processes with simple gestures. Both gestures in space and touch events on the surface of the workspace are detected. At the same time the system allows to project videos or interactive 3D-spaces on any kind of surface.

As an example this allows to zoom or rotate a workpart through simple gestures. In future development iterations we will integrate object detection allowing a context- or product-specific feedback on processes, e.g. in manual assembly. This context-aware feedback is a pre-requisite for the later implementation of gamification components. These will allow to integrate feedback smoothly and least disruptive while motivating the assistive system’s users.

The following video illustrates the prototype’s current features:

Augmentierte Produktion. Assistenzsysteme mit Projektion und Gamification für leistungsgeminderte und leistungsgewandelte Menschen

Korn, Oliver; Abele, Stephan; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:
Augmentierte Produktion. Assistenzsysteme mit Projektion und Gamification für leistungsgeminderte und leistungsgewandelte Menschen

In: Boll, S.; Maaß, S. & Malaka, R. (eds.): Tagungsband der Konferenz Mensch & Computer 2013, Oldenbourg Verlag, München, 2013, pp. 119-128

Abstract

Assistenzsysteme in der Produktion beschränken sich bislang darauf, Werkern Instruktionen zur Montage von Produkten zu geben. Eine Anpassung an die körperlichen und geistigen Fähigkeiten des Anwenders findet bislang nicht statt. Auch neue Konzepte der Mensch-Maschine-Interaktion (MMI) finden nur langsam Anwendung. Mit dem Prototypen eines augmentierten Assistenzsystems haben wir experimentell untersucht, wie zwei neuere Ansätze der MMI sich auf die Leistungsfähigkeit von Personen mit Leistungsminderungen auswirken: Die Projektion von Informationen direkt in den Arbeitsbereich (in-situ) und die Anreicherung von Arbeitsprozessen mit spielerischen Elementen (Gamification). Zugleich wurde die Akzeptanz solcher Systeme untersucht.

Augmented Manufacturing: A Study with Impaired Persons on Assistive Systems Using In-Situ Projection

Augmented Manufacturing - In Situ ProjectionKorn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:
Augmented Manufacturing: A Study with
Impaired Persons on Assistive Systems
Using In-Situ Projection

In: PETRA ’13 Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2013
DOI = 10.1145/2504335.2504356

Abstract

Production work requires a high level of awareness and especially manual assembly work is prone to human errors. At the same time the demand for manual assembly grows. Assistive systems in production environments (ASiPE) have to be augmented to improve the overall performance and reduce skill requirements.

In this study the prototype of an augmented ASiPE is applied in an experiment with impaired persons. It uses in-situ projection (i.e. the projection of work-relevant information directly into the working space, Figures 1, 8) to cognitively assist users in assembly and to improve their inclusion in regular work processes. The aim is to observe their behavior with this new form of human computer interaction and to empirically quantify the effects on performance both in time and quality.

The results show that the augmentation has a catalytic effect: The test subjects assembling slowly could not cope with the augmented ASiPE and performed worse than their counterparts without augmentation. The test subjects who worked faster than average assembled the product significantly better, both with respect to time (14.5% reduction) and especially to quality (45.8% error reduction). The ability to access the potential of augmented workplaces seems to be related to a worker’ cognitive potential which is not adequately mapped by the competence ratios sheltered work organizations currently use.

Exergames for Elderly Persons: Physical Exercise Software Based on Motion Tracking within the Framework of Ambient Assisted Living

Ser.Games+Virt.Worlds-CoverKorn, Oliver; Brach, Michael; Hauer, Klaus & Unkauf, Sven:
Exergames for Elderly Persons: Physical Exercise Software
Based on Motion Tracking within the Framework of Ambient Assisted Living

In: Bredl, Klaus & Bösche, Wolfgang (eds.):
Serious Games and Virtual Worlds in Education,
Professional Development, and Healthcare
,
chapter 16, Information Science Reference / IGI Global,
Hershey, PA, USA, 2013, 258-268
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-3673-6.ch016

Abstract

This chapter introduces the prototype of a software developed to assist elderly persons in performing physical exercises to prevent falls. The result — a combination of sport exercises and gaming — is also called “exergame.” The software is based on research and development conducted within the
“motivotion60+” research project as part of the AAL-program (Ambient Assisted Living).

The authors outline the use of motion recognition and analysis to promote physical activity among elderly people: it allows Natural Interaction (NI) and takes away the conventional controller, which represented a hurdle for the acceptance of technical solutions in the target group; it allows the real-time scaling of the exergame’s difficulty to adjust to the user’s individual fitness level and thus keep motivation up. The authors’ experiences with the design of the exergame and the first results from its evaluation regarding space, interaction, design, effort, and fun, as well as human factors, are portrayed. The authors also give an outlook on what future exergames using motion recognition should look like.

Full Text

http://www.igi-global.com/book/serious-games-virtual-worlds-education/72157