Posts Tagged ‘procedural content generation’

Procedural Content Generation for Game Props? A Study on the Effects on User Experience

By Oliver on April 12th, 2017 in games, HCI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Blatz, Michael; Rees, Adrian; Schaal, Jakob; Schwind, Valentin; Görlich, Daniel:

Procedural Content Generation for Game Props? A Study on the Effects on User Experience

In: Computers in Entertainment, 15(2), ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1:1–1:15

DOI = 10.1145/2974026

Text in ACM DL | Text on ResearchGate

Abstract

This work demonstrates the potentials of procedural content generation (PCG) for games, focusing on the generation of specific graphic props (reefs) in an explorer game. We briefly portray the state-of-the-art of PCG and compare various methods to create random patterns at runtime. Taking a step towards the game industry, we describe an actual game production and provide a detailed pseudocode implementation showing how Perlin or Simplex noise can be used efficiently.

In a comparative study, we investigate two alternative implementations of a decisive game prop: once created traditionally by artists and once generated by procedural algorithms. 41 test subjects played both implementations. The analysis shows that PCG can create a user experience that is significantly more realistic and at the same time perceived as more aesthetically pleasing. In addition, the ever-changing nature of the procedurally generated environments is preferred with high significance, especially by players aged 45 and above.

A Very Short History of Dynamic and Procedural Content Generation

By Oliver on April 7th, 2017 in games, publications

Blatz, Michael; Korn, Oliver:

A Very Short History of Dynamic and Procedural Content Generation

In: Korn, Oliver; Lee, Newton (Eds.): Game Dynamics. Best Practices in Procedural and Dynamic Game Content Generation, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2017, 1-13

DOI = 10.1007/978-3-319-53088-8_1

Abstract

This chapter portrays the historical and mathematical background of dynamic and procedural content generation (PCG). We portray and compare various PCG methods and analyze which mathematical approach is suited for typical applications in game design. In the next step, a structural overview of games applying PCG as well as types of PCG is presented. As abundant PCG content can be overwhelming, we discuss context-aware adaptation as a way to adapt the challenge to individual players’ requirements. Finally, we take a brief look at the future of PCG.

Book: Game Dynamics. Best Practices in Procedural and Dynamic Game Content Generation

By Oliver on April 5th, 2017 in games, HCI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Lee, Newton (Eds.):

Game Dynamics.
Best Practices in Procedural and Dynamic Game Content Generation

Springer Berlin Heidelberg, ISBN 978-3-319-53087-1

DOI = 10.1007/978-3-319-53088-8

Text on ResearchGate | Text on SpringerLink

Abstract

This book offers a compendium of best practices in game dynamics. It covers a wide range of dynamic game elements ranging from player behavior over artificial intelligence to procedural content generation. Such dynamics make virtual worlds more lively and realistic and they also create the potential for moments of amazement and surprise.

In many cases, game dynamics are driven by a combination of random seeds, player records and procedural algorithms. Games can even incorporate the player’s real-world behavior to create dynamic responses. The best practices illustrate how dynamic elements improve the user experience and increase the replay value.

The book draws upon interdisciplinary approaches; researchers and practitioners from Game Studies, Computer Science, Human-Computer Interaction, Psychology and other disciplines will find this book to be an exceptional resource of both creative inspiration and hands-on process knowledge.

Call for Chapters: PCG in the Game Industry

By Oliver on January 17th, 2016 in games, HCI, KORION, publications
Spaceship with procedurally generated configuration (KORION)

Spaceship with procedurally generated configuration (KORION)

Together with Newton Lee I am currently editing a book for the
Springer International Series on Computer Entertainment & Media Technology:

Procedural Content Generation in the Game Industry: Best Practices and Perspectives

 

Call for Chapter Proposals, by February 29, 2016

Overview

Procedural content generation (PCG) uses algorithms to create levels, items or story elements in games at runtime. The purpose of this book is to provide a hands-on overview on the application and the potentials of PCG.

The book is intended for game developers, computer scientists and gaming enthusiasts.

While there will be some historical and mathematical background on PCG, the focus lies on the actual application of PCG methods in games and game studies. The book will present a wide range of best practices ranging from platform games to sci-fi strategy, from indie to AAA; we are also interested in contributions on the economic and organizational potentials and challenges of projects where PCG was used.

The book draws upon an interdisciplinary approach. We invite contributions from researchers and practitioners from Game Studies, Computer Sciences, Human-Computer Interaction, Psychology and other disciplines.

Structure

Procedural Content Generation in the Game Industry is structured in three sections.

  • section 1 briefly describes the historical and mathematical background of PCG
  • section 2 represents the book’s main body: here best practices are presented. While we are especially interested in user experience studies, more technical topics are welcome
  • section 3 examines the economic and organizational potentials and challenges of projects where PCG was used

Topics

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Game Design for games with procedurally generated content
  • User Experience (UX) Studies on games with PCG elements
  • PCG algorithms and tools, e.g. Perlin noise
  • History of PCG use in games, from Rogue to Borderlands and beyond
  • Organizational and management strategies related to PCG
  • Economic impact of PCG

Submission

In the first step, researchers and practitioners are invited to submit a 2-page (max. 1200 words) chapter proposal explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by February 21, 2016. Author anonymity is not required in this step.

Please use the Easy Chair submission system:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=pcgbook17

or send the abstract to: pcgbook17@easychair.org

Springer-Book-Chapter-Template.

Important Dates

  • February 29, 2016: Proposal Submission Deadline (abstract, max. 1200 words)
  • March 06, 2016: Notification of Proposal Acceptance
  • June 12, 2016: Full Chapter Submission
  • July 24, 2016: Review Results Returned
  • September 25, 2016: Final Chapter Submission
  • October 23, 2016: Final Chapter Acceptance Notification

All submitted chapters are peer-reviewed on a single-blind review basis.
Contributors may also be asked to serve as reviewers.