Posts Tagged ‘projection’

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

Korn, Oliver; Dix, Alan:

Educational Playgrounds: How Context-aware Systems Enable Playful Coached Learning

In: Interactions, 24(1), 54–57, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/3012951

Abstract

In this article, we present the vision of a context-aware system that supports educators and offers students what we call playful coached learning (PCL).

Insights

  • A system that is aware of real-world interactions strongly contributes to the user’s sense of interaction and exchange.
  • Adding gamification is not enough. PCL should also consider a student’s emotions.
  • Learning with a context-aware system can be a relief for students and educators, increasing their autonomy.
  • PCL is a good example of a combinatory innovation.

Gamification of a Workday. A Study on the Effects in Sheltered Employment

By Oliver on February 9th, 2016 in assistive systems, conferences, gamification, HCI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Lang, Johannes; Korge, Andreas; Causegic, Haris; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Gamification of a Workday. A Study on the Effects in Sheltered Employment

CHI-16-LBW-gamification-workdayIn: CHI ’16 Extended Abstracts of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2016
DOI = 10.1145/2851581.2892283

Abstract

Gamification implies the application of methods and design patterns from gaming to non-gaming areas like learning or working. We applied an existing gamification design to production processes in an organization which provides sheltered employment for impaired persons.

In contrast to existing work, we investigated not only a short period but a complete workday to measure the effects on the performance of impaired workers.

The study indicates that gamification has
(1) a negative effect on workers with considerable cognitive impairments,
(2) no measurable effect on workers with medium cognitive impairments and
(3) a positive effect on workers with mild cognitive impairments.

PresentationCHI4good

This work will be presented at CHI ’16 (May 7-12) in San Jose, California, USA.

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

By Oliver on May 4th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

PETRA-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Design Approaches for the Gamification of Production Environments. A Study Focusing on Acceptance

In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM,
New York, NY, USA, 2015
DOI = 10.1145/2769493.2769549

Abstract

Gamification is an ever more popular method to increase motivation and user experience in real-world settings. It is widely used in the areas of marketing, health and education. However, in production environments, it is a new concept. To be accepted in the industrial domain, it has to be seamlessly integrated in the regular work processes.

In this work we make the following contributions to the field of gamification in production: (1) we analyze the state of the art and introduce domain-specific requirements; (2) we present two implementations gamifying production based on alternative design approaches; (3) these are evaluated in a sheltered work organization. The comparative study focuses acceptance, motivation and perceived happiness.

The results reveal that a pyramid design showing each work process as a step on the way towards a cup at the top is strongly preferred to a more abstract approach where the processes are represented by a single circle and two bars.

Presentation

This work was presented at the PETRA 2015 in Korfu, Greece.

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

EICS-2015-Workplace-with-GamificationKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:

Towards a Gamification of Industrial Production. A Comparative Study in Sheltered Work Environments

In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM SIGCHI Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = 10.1145/2774225.2774834

Abstract

Using video game elements to improve user experience and user engagement in non-game applications is called “gamification”. This method of enriching human-computer interaction has been applied successfully in education, health and general business processes. However, it has not been established in industrial production so far.

After discussing the requirements specific for the production domain we present two workplaces augmented with gamification. Both implementations are based on a common framework for context-aware assistive systems but exemplify different approaches: the visualization of work performance is complex in System 1 and simple in System 2.

Based on two studies in sheltered work environments with impaired workers, we analyze and compare the systems’ effects on work and on workers. We show that gamification leads to a speed-accuracy-tradeoff if no quality-related feedback is provided. Another finding is that there is a highly significant raise in acceptance if a straightforward visualization approach for gamification is used.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the EICS 2015 in Duisburg, Germany.

Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

By Oliver on March 10th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, conferences, HCI, HMI, publications

CHI-15_WorkshopFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Enabling End Users to Program for Smart Environments

In: Proceedings of the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Workshop End-User Development in the Internet of Things Era (EUDITE) ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2015 [to be published]
DOI = n/a

Abstract

In the Internet of Things area, sensor-based smart environments are becoming more and more ubiquitous. Smart environments can support user’s cognitive abilities and support them in various tasks e.g. assembling, or cooking.

However, programming applications for smart environments still requires a lot of e ort as many sensors
need to be programmed and synchronized. In this work, we present a novel approach for programming procedures in smart environments through demonstrating a task. We de fine abstract high-level areas that are triggered by the user while performing a task. According to the triggered areas, projected instructions for performing the task again are automatically created. Those instructions can then be transferred to other users to learn how to assemble a product or to cook a meal.

We present a prototypical implementation of a smart environment using optical sensors and present how it can be used in a smart factory and in a smart kitchen.

Presentation

This work will be presented at the CHI 2015 in Seoul, Korea.

Book chapter: Assistive Systems for the Workplace: Towards Context-Aware Assistance

By Oliver on February 10th, 2015 in assistive systems, assistive technology, HCI, HMI, publications

Korn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assistive Systems for the Workplace: Towards Context-Aware Assistance

In: Assistive Technologies for Physical and Cognitive Disabilities. IGI Global, 2015. pp 121-135
DOI = 10.4018/978-1-4666-7373-1.ch006

Abstract

Assist-Sys-for-the-WorkplaceRecent advances in motion recognition allow the development of Context-Aware Assistive Systems (CAAS) for industrial workplaces that go far beyond the state of the art: they can capture a user’s movement in real-time and provide adequate feedback. Thus, CAAS can address important questions, like Which part is assembled next? Where do I fasten it? Did an error occur? Did I process the part in time? These new CAAS can also make use of projectors to display the feedback within the corresponding area on the workspace (in-situ). Furthermore, the real-time analysis of work processes allows the implementation of motivating elements (gamification) into the repetitive work routines that are common in manual production.

In this chapter, the authors first describe the relevant backgrounds from industry, computer science, and psychology. They then briefly introduce a precedent implementation of CAAS and its inherent problems. The authors then provide a generic model of CAAS and finally present a revised and improved implementation.

http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/assistive-systems-for-the-workplace/122906

PhD thesis: Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection

At May 21st I finished my PhD in Computer Science at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) at the University of Stuttgart. The advisors were Prof. Dr. Albrecht Schmidt from the VIS and Prof. Dr. Fillia Makedon from the Universiy of Texas Alington (UTA). The work is based on the project ASLM acquired by Prof. Dr. Thomas Hörz from the University of Applied Sciences Esslingen and was continued in the project motionEAP.

Diss-CoverThe PhD is situated in the University of Stuttgart’s SimTech Cluster and was supported by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy. It is published as “Open Source” – this means you can download and distribute this work freely as long as you indicate the source:

Context-Aware Assistive Systems for Augmented Work. A Framework Using Gamification and Projection (PDF, 7.7 MB)

If you prefer a printed version you can order it at Lulu Press.

Keywords:

assistive systems, assistive technologies, gamification, projection, motion recognition, context-aware, game design, human computer interaction, HCI, elderly, impaired, ethics, digital factory, cyber-physical systems, CPS

Abstract:

While context-aware assistive systems (CAAS) have become ubiquitous in cars or smartphones, most workers in production environments still rely on their skills and expertise to make the right choices and movements. (more…)

Context-aware Assistive Systems at the Workplace. Analyzing the Effects of Projection and Gamification

CAAS-ModelKorn, Oliver; Funk, Markus; Abele, Stephan; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:
Context-aware Assistive Systems at the Workplace. Analyzing the Effects of Projection and Gamification

In: PETRA ’14 Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2014
DOI =10.1145/2674396.2674406

Abstract

Context-aware assistive systems (CAAS) have become ubiquitous in cars or smartphones but not in industrial work contexts: while there are systems controlling work results, context-specific assistance during the processes is hardly offered. As a result production workers still have to rely on their skills and expertise. While un-impaired workers may cope well with this situation, elderly or impaired persons in production environments need context-sensitive assistance.

The contribution of the research presented here is three-fold: (1) We provide a framework for context-aware assistive systems in production environments. These systems are based on motion recognition and use projection and elements from game design (gamification) to augment work. (2) Based on this framework we describe a prototype with respect to both the physical and the software implementation. (3) We present the results of a study with impaired workers and quantifying the effects of the augmentations on work speed and quality.

Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Workplace using In-Situ Projection

table_sketchFunk, Markus; Korn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht:
Assisitive Augmentation at the Manual Assembly Workplace using In-Situ Projection

In: CHI ’14 Workshop on Assistive Augmentation. April 27th 2014.

Abstract [CHI-Worshop Paper]

In this paper, we argue for using in-situ projection to augment a user’s working experience. By recognizing objects on a workplace, the system is able to detect the current step within a workflow. Based on the information about position and orientation of the work-piece, speci c feedback can be given – even as a projection on top of the workpiece. So far, our work indicates that this technology is accepted by the industry. Currently, we are investigating the use of gami cation elements on the error rate. Additionally, we introduce a model for the conception of context aware assistive systems (CAAS). With our workshop participation, we want to discuss the potentials of in-situ projection at the manual workplace with the participants.

Augmented Manufacturing: A Study with Impaired Persons on Assistive Systems Using In-Situ Projection

Augmented Manufacturing - In Situ ProjectionKorn, Oliver; Schmidt, Albrecht; Hörz, Thomas:
Augmented Manufacturing: A Study with
Impaired Persons on Assistive Systems
Using In-Situ Projection

In: PETRA ’13 Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on PErvasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2013
DOI = 10.1145/2504335.2504356

Abstract

Production work requires a high level of awareness and especially manual assembly work is prone to human errors. At the same time the demand for manual assembly grows. Assistive systems in production environments (ASiPE) have to be augmented to improve the overall performance and reduce skill requirements.

In this study the prototype of an augmented ASiPE is applied in an experiment with impaired persons. It uses in-situ projection (i.e. the projection of work-relevant information directly into the working space, Figures 1, 8) to cognitively assist users in assembly and to improve their inclusion in regular work processes. The aim is to observe their behavior with this new form of human computer interaction and to empirically quantify the effects on performance both in time and quality.

The results show that the augmentation has a catalytic effect: The test subjects assembling slowly could not cope with the augmented ASiPE and performed worse than their counterparts without augmentation. The test subjects who worked faster than average assembled the product significantly better, both with respect to time (14.5% reduction) and especially to quality (45.8% error reduction). The ability to access the potential of augmented workplaces seems to be related to a worker’ cognitive potential which is not adequately mapped by the competence ratios sheltered work organizations currently use.